Via dailymail.co.uk

Uber has grounded all of its self-driving cars after one of the automated vehicles crashed and flipped onto its side in Arizona.

The taxi app company has taken its fleet of self-driving cars off the roads in three cities until the investigation of a Friday accident in Tempe, Arizona, is completed.

The fleet of automated cars in Phoenix, Pittsburgh and San Francisco were pulled off streets by Saturday.

The automated Uber Volvo was in self-driving mode when the accident occurred.

A spokesman for the scandal-hit firm said Sunday: ‘We are continuing to look into this incident and can confirm we had no backseat passengers in the vehicle.’

Uber has grounded all of its self-driving cars after a high impact accident where an automated vehicle crashed and flipped onto its side in Tempe, Arizona, on Friday (pictured)

Uber has grounded all of its self-driving cars after a high impact accident where an automated vehicle crashed and flipped onto its side in Tempe, Arizona, on Friday (pictured)

Uber confirmed the Volvo was in self-driving mode at the time of the accident but said there were no injuries or customers inside the car

Uber confirmed the Volvo was in self-driving mode at the time of the accident but said there were no injuries or customers inside the car

At the time of the accident, the vehicle was in self-driving mode and there were two people in the front of the car to monitor the car’s performance and to take over if there was an emergency, reported the Financial Times.

It was not clear why the car’s safety features didn’t prevent the crash, or if the employees in the car attempted to manually override the vehicle before the crash.

The incident occurred when another vehicle turned left in front of the Uber, causing the collision and the self-driving car to roll onto its side, reported 12 News.

Uber's fleet of self-driving cars are currently in Phoenix, Pittsburgh and San Francisco and all of the cars were pulled off streets by Saturday.

Uber’s fleet of self-driving cars are currently in Phoenix, Pittsburgh and San Francisco and all of the cars were pulled off streets by Saturday.

Currently, there are 12 self-driving Ubers on the road in Phoenix, less than 15 miles away from Tempe, where the accident happened. All of these automated cars were taken off the streets while the company investigates the incident.

The company followed up on Saturday and pulled the automated cars off the road in Pittsburgh and San Francisco, the two other locations where it operates self-driving vehicles

The car-hailing service has been dented by a series of bad news stories, including disclosures about a culture of sexism, cut-throat workplace tactics and covert use of law enforcement-evading software.

This isn’t the first time one of the company’s automated cars was involved in a traffic incident.

In December of 2016, one of the self-driving cars sped through a red light in San Francisco. There was an employee in the car at the time, but there are conflicting reports if it was a human or machine error, reported the New York Times.

It was revealed that Uber's automated cars can only drive for less than a mile without a human having to take over the wheel. Pictured is Anthony Levandowski, head of Uber's self-driving program

It was revealed that Uber’s automated cars can only drive for less than a mile without a human having to take over the wheel. Pictured is Anthony Levandowski, head of Uber’s self-driving program

This isn't the first time one of the company's automated cars was involved in a traffic incident. In December of 2016, one of the self-driving cars sped through a red light in San Francisco

This isn’t the first time one of the company’s automated cars was involved in a traffic incident. In December of 2016, one of the self-driving cars sped through a red light in San Francisco

In shocking leaked data, it was revealed that Uber’s automated cars can only drive for less than a mile without a human having to take over the wheel.

The cars, which are being road tested in Pennsylvania, Arizona and California, could only drive for 0.7 miles without assistance in February.

And during one week, the vehicles could only drive for 50 miles before needing a ‘critical’ human intervention to prevent them from hitting a person or causing at least $5,000 worth of property damage.

After striking a deal with Volvo, the company started testing its self-driving vehicles on the road – with human drivers sitting in the cars to provide backup.